Chapter 17, 18, 19 Mr Chips Question Answers


Chapter 17, 18, 19 (Mr.Chips) Question Answers Punjab all boards Grade 12 FSc Pre Engineering include solved exercises, review questions, MCQs, and chapter overview.

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Chapter 17 Mr.Chips Question Answers

Q 1. What were two things which Chips could not do in his life?

Answer:
 The two things that Mr. Chips could not do in his life were: he had not traveled by air and had never been to a talk show.

Q 2. What arrangements had Mrs. Wickett made before visiting her relatives in a neighbouring village?

Answer:
Before visiting her relatives in a neighbouring village, Mrs. Wickett had made arrangements for tea. She had left the tea-things ready on the table with bread and butter. She had also left some extra cups which would be needed in case anybody called on Mr. Chips.

Q 3. Who was Linford?

Answer:
Linford was a small boy who came to meet Mr. Chips on a foggy day before his death. He told Mr. Chips that he was the first of his family at Brookfield. Mr. Chips welcomed him with open arms.

Q 4. How did Chips serve Linford?

Answer:
Mr. Chips served Linford with tea and walnut cake with pink icing. He also shared with him his past memories of Brookfield.

Q 5. How did Chips feel when Linford said, “Good-bye, Mr. Chips”?

OR
What memories came to Mr. Chips’ mind when Linford said, “Good-bye, Mr. Chips”?

Answer:
Mr. Chips became sad and gloomy as soon as Linford said, “Good-bye Mr. Chips.” These words made him remember his dead wife who had said the same words to him on the night before their wedding.


Chapter 18 (Mr.Chips)

Q 1. Since how long had Cartwright been the headmaster of Brookfield?
    OR
Who was Cartwright?

Answer:
Cartwright had been the headmaster of Brookfield since 1919.

Q 2. What did Mr. Chips see when he opened his eyes and regained his consciousness?

Answer:
When Mr. Chips opened his eyes and regained his consciousness, he saw Dr. Merivale, Mrs. Wickett, Cartwright, who was the new Head of Brookfield, and Old Buffles around his bed.

Q 3. What was the announcement made by Cartwright in the morning at Brookfield?

Answer:
Cartwright announced the death of Mr. Chips in the morning at Brookfield. In his speech, he said, “Brookfield will never forget his lovableness.”

Q 4. What will Linford remember?

Answer:
Linford would remember that he had met Mr.Chips and said good-bye to him the night before he died.

Q 5. How did Mr. Chips die?

Answer:
Mr. Chips died peacefully. At the time of his death, he remembered his sweet wife, Katherine, and all his students whom he had taught at Brookfield.


Chapter 19 (Mr.Chips)

Q 1. Write a note on Brookfield.

Answer:

Brookfield was a public school in England. It was an old foundation established during the reign of Queen Elizabeth. The school was located at a beautiful site. It was surrounded by a cluster of elm trees and the open fen fields. It consisted of a group of eighteenth-century buildings centred upon quadrangle. There were acres of extensive playgrounds.

The fame of Brookfield was never consistent. It never became as famous as the other British Schools at Harrow and Eton. The school faced many ups and downs, declining to almost to non-existence at one time, and rising to fame at another. During the reign of the first George, Brookfield rose to fame and the strength of the students increased, so the main structure of the school was rebuilt and the building was expanded. Unfortunately, the school again lost its reputation again during Napoleon wars and mid-Victorian days.

In 1840, Mr. Wetherby was appointed as the Headmaster of Brookfield. He worked very sincerely and devotedly and restored its fame to a great extent. Although Brookfield could not rise to the front rank status, however, it maintained the position of a good school of the second rank. It was a privately managed school. Many rich families generously contributed funds for its management. Many of its students turned out to become history-making men from members of Parliament, colonial administrators, peers and bishops to merchants, country squires and parsons. In this way, the school contributed to the different strata of England.

Board of Governors managed the affairs of the school. It appointed the teachers and the Headmasters. It financed the school through donations from the well-placed persons. The Board rarely interfered with the working of the school. However, in case of serious matters, the chairman of the Board of Governors would visit the school to settle the dispute.

In 1900, Ralston was appointed the Headmaster of Brookfield. He was very ambitious to raise the standard of the school. He improved the discipline and academic standard of the school by introducing modern teaching techniques. He personally contacted the rich families and persuaded them to send their children to Brookfield. During his period, a long list of the students seeking admission to this institution. The reputation of the school was spread far and wide.

Since much emphasis was laid on discipline in Brookfield, the students were taught to inculcate in them a sense of proportion. They were made good law-abiding citizens. The school had good hostels for students and spacious residences for teachers. Games were also an integral part of school life. The school had vast playgrounds where matches were played frequently. It had strong teams of football and cricket.

To sum up, Brookfield was a nominal school though it was not modern. It had a rich traditional and cultural heritage.

Q 2. What contribution did Brookfield make to England?

                                                               OR

Write down the contribution of Brookfield to the English nation.

Answer:

Brookfield made a tremendous contribution to England and the prosperity of its nation. It produced history-making personalities. The school also raised many judges and bishops. Great politicians and Civil Administrators also streamed out from this historic school. Professional people like major merchants, manufacturers as well as businessmen also came out of the school.  Brookfield supplied a great number of educated people to serve England in every walk of life.

Whenever there was a national emergency, the school came forward to help the people. When World War I broke out in 1914, it also contributed to the war effort. Quite a few of the teachers and students joined the Armed Forces. Many students of Brookfield took part in World War I to defend their beloved country and sacrificed their lives. Many young teachers also joined the army and rendered military services. The school ground was also used by the army for training the personnel during the war. Some of them laid their lives for the country.

When the School building was bombarded by the enemy during the war, the teachers like Mr. Chips went on teaching and did not let their spirits go down. In this way, Brookfield served the country not only in peace but in war also. Its students played a vital role during the general strike. In this way, the school made a great contribution to England both in the time of peace and war.

Q 3. Draw the character sketch of Mr. Chips.

Answer:

Mr. Chipping lovingly called Mr. Chips represents the class of people who follow traditions and conventions established since long. He was an ideal husband and a devoted teacher who was considerate towards the students.

He was born in 1848 and graduated from Cambridge University. He joined Mulberry School in 1869 at the age of twenty-one. He faced some discipline problems there, so he resigned and joined Brookfield School in 1870. After his retirement, he started living at Mrs. Wickett’s house opposite the school and participated actively in the school activities. He died in November 1933. He married Katherine Bridges at the age of forty-eight. Katherine exercised visible influence on him and brought about remarkable changes in his personality. He served Brookfield for a long period of forty-seven years and retired from service in 1918.

He had never travelled by air. He had conservative views and disliked the radical opinions of George Bernard Shaw, William Morris and Ibsen. He disapproved women’s freedom and proximity to men. He looked down upon them riding the bicycles and acquiring education in the universities with men. Although his ideas were broadened under the influence of Katherine, yet he remained a typical conservative at heart.

Mr. Chips had no lofty aims and his only ambition was to become the senior master of the school. He was devoted, diligent and dutiful to his profession. In spite of the fact that he had a mediocre academic degree, he proved himself an efficient teacher who was respected and honoured by the students, their parents and his colleagues. Before his marriage to Katherine Bridges, he was a dry and neutral sort of person, but a pleasant change occurred in his personality afterwards. Although he was not harsh to the students, his class discipline improved and his humour blossomed. He became lovable and popular at Brookfield. When he had a row with Ralston, he realized how much Brookfield loved him. It was due to his popularity that he was made the Acting Head of Brookfield twice.

Mr. Chips was very generous by nature. He gave money to the needy people during the Brookfield mission. In his will, he gave all his money to Mrs. Wickett and to the School. He was so compassionate that he even announced the name of the German colleague, who was killed on the Western border while fighting against the English.

On the whole, Mr Chips was an amiable, good-natured and affectionate person. He was devoted to his profession. He possessed a humorous temperament and was loved and honoured by the entire Brookfield.

Q 4. Write a note on Mr. Chips as a teacher.

Answer:

Mr. Chips graduated from Cambridge University in London and taught Roman History and Greek language at Brookfield. He started his career as a teacher at the age of twenty one when he joined Melbury School. On account of disciplinary issues, he left the job and joined Brookfield School. He was conservative in his views. He was not a revolutionary; rather he adhered to the old methods of pedagogy.  Under the advice of Mr. Wetherby, the headmaster, he took firm attitude on the very first day at Brookfield and punished Colley for his mischief.

Through his hard work and selfless devotion to his profession, he earned a secure place for himself at Brookfield as a teacher. He was not a progressive, dynamic and enlightened teacher. He refused to change his outlook and teaching strategies with the changing time. However, he was the upholder of dignity, generosity and sense of proportion which were becoming rare in the modern world. He was the embodiment of old values which reflected in his reaching. He was a very affectionate, gentle, sympathetic and considerate teacher.

Ralston, the new headmaster at Brookfield, was not pleased with Mr. Chips’ style of teaching. He thought that Chips’ personal habits were slovenly and he was slack in work. He found Mr. Chips’ teaching methodology and Latin pronunciation to be outdated. However, Chips refused to change himself. He was popular in Brookfield in spite of all these weaknesses. He believed in inculcating the sense of proportion among his students and making them fine individuals.

Mr. Chips came to be known as a jester on account of his humorous disposition. His lectures were replete with light jokes and students loved listening to his humorous remarks. Mr. Chips was extremely devoted to his profession. He delivered his lectures with great zeal and devotion and performed his duties with earnest diligence. He was so punctual that he came to school even on the day his wife Katherine died. After his retirement in 1916, Chatteris, who was the headmaster of the School, requested him to offer his services to Brookfield, and he willingly joined again. He was so dedicated to teaching that while bombers were dropping bombs all around the school during the First World War, he remained composed and continued teaching.

Mr. Chips had a very sharp memory and a strong affiliation with the students. He invited them to tea even after his retirement. He recalled the names of his old students and their youth. When the names of his old students who were killed during the war were read out in the assembly, he seemed to have the living picture of those boys in his vision.

His greatest powers as a teacher lay in his genial heart and affection for his students. He treated them as his own children. He shared their sorrows and pleasure. When one of his students, Grayson was sad for his father who was on board on Titanic, which had sunk, Chips sympathized with the boy and excused him. Even at the last moments of his life, he heard the chorus of the names of his students.

Mr. Chips was an institution in himself. He served as a teacher at Brookfield for about forty-seven years and earned himself respect, honour, fame and above all love of the students. After retirement, he lived at Mrs. Wickett’s house which was opposite to the school and remained associated with Brookfield till his death in 1933.

Q 5. Write an account of Mr. Chips’ married life.

Answer:

Mr. Chips’ married life was very short but it left an imprint on his mind and a profound impression on his personality. He got married in 1896 and his wife, Katherine died in 1898 during childbirth. Thus, his married life was limited to the short span of two years only.

Mr. Chips had a very poor opinion about women from the beginning. He did not like the modern women of late Victorian Age who were very advanced. Mr. Chips held the view that these women were clever, cunning and active. They read the dramas of Ibsen and Bernard Shaw who advocated freethinking. For this reason, Mr. Chips remained an unmarried fellow even up to the forty-eight years of his age when he accidentally encountered Katherine Bridges.

Mr. Chips was elated to get married to Katherine and their companionship was exemplary. Her free-thinking and radical views influenced him a lot. Before their marriage, he was a dry sort of person. However, after he got married, his personality was transformed under the influence of Katherine. He became lenient in his treatment with students and developed a great sense of humour over time. His mind became more active and he began to take more interest in life. She used to advise him about the matters regarding students’ behaviour and classroom discipline. The youth and modernity of Katherine developed the habit of free-thinking and broad-mindedness in Mr. Chips’ attitude. He became more adventurous. Mr. Chips’ married life was peaceful and he cherished the time spent with Katherine till his reached his death bed in 1933, thirty-five years after her death.

Q 6. What influence did Katherine Bridges exercise on Mr. Chips?

                                                                   OR

What was the influence of Katherine Bridges on Mr. Chips’ personality and style of teaching?

Answer:

The change in Mr. Chips’ personality after the marriage was quite remarkable. Before his marriage, Mr. Chips had been a dry and neutral sort of person. Although he was respected by his colleagues and students alike, but he had not gained much popularity or affection. He was never able to generate inspiration in them before.

Katherine exercised an immense influence on him. She transformed his personality. His eyes gained sparkle and he became more adventurous. Katherine’s company made him more genial, active, confident, open-minded and generous. The qualities which lay hidden in Chips’ personality came to surface. His sense of humour blossomed and students enjoyed his teaching. Now he became less rigid and more lovable.

Katherine was more intelligent, progressive, modern and perhaps more sharp than her husband, so she broadened his views and opinions and blessed him with an outlook far beyond the limited world of Brookfield. As she was more intelligent and cleverer than him, so he could not refute her ideas even if he disagreed with them.

Sometimes, Katherine persuaded him completely. It was Katherine who suggested that a team from Mission School should come and play a football match against Brookfield. The idea was so revolutionary that everyone opposed it. They feared hooliganism from the slum boys.  Even Chips was an ardent opponent of the proposal but he could not resist long.

Chips always treated the advice of Katherine as judicious and would not accept them at once. Even in such cases, he would repent later for not having taken his advice. Even in the later years, after Katherine’s death, whenever he had trouble with a boy, he would think what she would have advised him.

He was a quiet and conventional person before his marriage to Katherine.  He particularly disliked the women of his time on account of their radical views. He liked weak, timid and delicate women. He disliked modern writers like Bernard Shaw, Isben and Morris.

In short, Mr. Chips’ marriage to Katherine brought about a revolution in his life. In spite of the visible difference in their ages, it was a triumphant success. Prior to his marriage, he was certainly obeyed and honoured, but now the students felt a new charm in the presence of the old teacher. He became lovable and inspired all students.

Q 7. Describe the first encounter between Mr. Chips and Katherine Bridges.

                                                                 OR

Describe the circumstances leading to the marriage of Mr. Chips? OR Describe the most romantic and thrilling scene of ‘Good-bye Mr. Chips’.

Answer:

Both small and big incidents in a novel make up the entire impact of a novel. So is the case with Goodbye Mr. Chips. The first encounter of Mr. Chips and Katherine is the most interesting incident in the novel.

During the summer vacation in 1896, Mr. Chips went to a mountain called Great Gable with his colleague who had to leave on account of some family business so Mr. Chips was left alone. One day, he saw a girl waving her hand while climbing on Great Gable and thought that she was calling for help because she was in danger. So, he hurried to help her. She was actually waving at her friend. In this effort, he slipped and his ankle got sprained.

Finding Mr. Chips in trouble, the girl ran to help him. That girl was Katherine Bridges. She considered herself responsible for his accident. So she visited him daily and nursed him.

She was a young girl of twenty-five with blue flashing eyes and freckled cheeks. Katherine was deeply impressed by modern writers. She believed in the freedom of women. She was quite modern and educated while Mr. Chips, on the other hand, was a conservative man of forty-eight.

In spite of the difference of age and thought between Katherine and Mr. Chips, this chance encounter resulted in their friendship. She liked him for his gentle and quiet manners, brown eyes and charming smile. Katherine felt that this elderly man was not a bore. Gradually, they fell in love with each other. Finally, they got married in 1896. Their marriage was a triumphant success. Katherine conquered Brookfield as she had conquered Chips.

Q 8. Describe the quarrel between Ralston and Chips.

                                                            OR

What was the inherent conflict between Mr. Chips and Ralston?

Answer:

Ralston was a newly appointed headmaster of Brookfield. He was an energetic, young fellow of thirty-seven. The author tells us that he was efficient but not, very likeable. He knew that Mr. Chips was an old fashioned teacher. Naturally, he did not like him. Mr. Ralston often said that he was a Science man himself. He was very keen to raise Brookfield to the first rank schools. He told Mr. Chips he aspires to make Brookfield a thoroughly up-to-date school.

He was very strict with students and even with the teachers. He had the kind of personality that could reduce big hall to silence by a mere lifting of an eyebrow. However, Ralston was feared and respected but not liked.

One day, he called Mr. Chips to his study and asked him when he would get retirement from the service. Mr. Chips was surprised by the question. When Ralston found him unwilling, he spoke out his heart and raised his objections. He revealed that he found Chips’ teaching methods to be slack and old-fashioned. He complained that Mr. Chips’ personal habits are sloppy and that he dwelled in the past.

All this was very insulting to Mr. Chips. He said, “Look at the gown you are wearing”. He objected to his Latin pronunciation and said he wanted the new style of pronunciation to be taught at Brookfield. Mr. Chips was not convinced of Ralston’s philosophy of teaching. He said that the boys should be taught the pronunciation that they would practically use even outside Brookfield. Therefore, he did not agree to pronounce “ Cicero ” as “ Kickero ”.

Mr. Chips thought that Ralston was trying to run Brookfield like a factory for turning out a snob culture based on money and machines. Luckily, a small boy had been listening to their dialogue. Students adored Mr. Chips, so the news spread all over in no time. A strong protest rose against Ralston. The board of governors was informed about the issue. The chairman of the board himself visited the school. He ignored Ralston and went to Mr. Chips. He told him that the board disliked Ralston because he was “a bit too clever”. He said to Mr. Chips that Brookfield wouldn’t be the same without him.

The row between Mr. Chips and Ralston is, in fact, a symbol of the clash between new ideas and old, long cherished values respectively. Victory fell to Mr. Chips as the chairman of the Board supported him, so Ralston had to quit Brookfield

Q 9. Write a note on Mr. Chips’ humor.

Answer:

Mr. Chips came to be known as a jester on account of his humorous disposition. His lectures were replete with light jokes and students loved listening to his humorous remarks. After his marriage with Katherine, his humour blossomed. It became more pleasant and enjoyable. His humour was not ironical or malicious, it was friendly and cheerful.

Mr. Chips was a devoted teacher. He knew how to make his lectures on the boring subjects interesting and enjoyable. Humour was the marked quality of his teaching style which made him endearing to his students. His cheerful and compassionate attitude always attracted the students, to be frank with him. They enjoyed the liberty of having some practical jokes with Chips, an example of which is that they sent Linford to Chips’ apartment when he had not called him. The students always expected new jokes from him.

Humour was Mr. Chips’ second nature. Even on the sad occasions, his sense of humour was always active. For instance, on the day of his retirement, people sat with heavy hearts. Mr. Chips himself was sad. Parting with Brookfield was not so easy. Brookfield was his only world beyond which he could see or wanted to see nothing. Yet when a small boy was appreciating him, the boy paid great homage to his worthy teacher. Mr. Chips said that the boy had exaggerated the facts in praise of his teacher. But he linked it with the boy’s family and said that he belonged to a family of exaggeration and that his father had also exaggerated his marks in one exam.

The humour of Mr. Chips was pure and sprang from within. He was an old book. He had a great love for his students. It did not pinch or prick anybody. It was most sincere and was sincerely received. He did not laugh at others, he laughed with others. There was no ill will in his humour.

Mr. Chips used humour in his teaching career right from the start. After his marriage, his sense of humour blossomed into sudden richness and maturity. Katherine enlivened his sense of humour. His sense of humour made him popular among the students. Wherever he went and whatever he said people laughed. He earned the reputation of great jester and jests were expected of him.

Whenever he rose to speak in a meeting or even when he talked across a table, people anticipated his jokes. Not only had he used humour to amuse and entertain people but also to educate them. He used to share mnemonics and puns with his students. These techniques not only entertained students but also left an imprint on their minds and faces for the joke.

Q 10. Can we look upon Mr. Chips as an institution of Brookfield?

Answer:

Mr. Chips is the embodiment of Brookfield. He symbolized the traditions and heritage of the school. He had a strong affiliation with Brookfield. Even after his retirement, he remained in touch with the students and invited them over tea. When Mr. Chatteris requested him to lend his services as a teacher in the time of need, he rejoined Brookfield willingly and also became the Acting Head of the school twice. He used to attend the reunions at School as the chief guest.

Mr. Chips remembered the fathers and grandfathers of his students. He could freely criticize any of them with the pride and liberty of a teacher. Sometimes, a twist of words, pun, irony and his retentive memory worked out their magic and humour was created. His jokes were far more than mere jokes. They imprinted lessons on the minds of the taught. Students loved to attend his classes because of him and they never knew that they were being taught.

It was Brookfield that established Mr. Chips as a teacher. Mr. Chips and Brookfield were inseparable. He recalled the names of his students even on his death bed and considered them all his own children. Therefore, we can say that Mr. Chips was an institution of Brookfield.

Q 11. Draw the character sketch of Katherine Bridges.

Answer:

Katherine Bridges was a young and beautiful girl of twenty-five. She had blue, flashing eyes, freckled cheeks and smooth straw-coloured hair. She was a governess by profession. Mr. Chips came across her during his visit to the Lake District. Her fearless and impressive manners won Mr. Chips’ heart. Katherine was social and liberal. She believed in the revolutionary ideas of the writers like Bernard Shaw, Ibsen and William Morris. She was a radical socialist. She was in favour of equality, fraternity and freedom of women.

Katherine was a revolutionary. Being a woman did not bar her from climbing hills and riding bicycles. In fact, she wanted the woman to be having equal rights like men by being admitted to universities and being allowed to vote.

Before his marriage, Mr. Chips was a dull, dry and neutral sort of person. He had earned respect, confidence, satisfaction, but was not inspiring to the students. He drifted aimlessly through life and his teaching lacked orientation. With her impressive and charming personality, Katherine broadened his views and opinions, improved his discipline and sharpened his sense of humour. He was honoured and obeyed by everyone but after his marriage people began to love him due to the changes brought about in his personality by Katherine.

Katherine gave a new dimension to the future of Brookfield. She entered like a gleam of modernity in the ancient surrounding of Brookfield. She was the centre of attention wherever she went. She persuaded Chips and other teachers to invite the football team of the Mission school to play a match with the boys of Brookfield school. That’s when she gained popularity among the boys and teachers at Brookfield.

Katherine’s life was short and beautiful. She died one year after her marriage on April 1st, 1898, during childbirth. Her companionship left an everlasting impression on Mr. Chips’ life.

Q 12. Write a short note on views and ideas of Katherine Bridges.

Answer:

Katherine Bridges is the female protagonist of the novel, ‘Good-bye, Mr. Chips. She was a beautiful, young lady with blue eyes and soft hair. She was twenty-five years old when she married Mr. Chips and died during childbirth only two years later, in 1898. Katherine had a modern outlook towards life. Her ideas were quite revolutionary. She was a zealous supporter of the right to vote for women. She was a reactionary in politics. She was a modern woman of the later Victorian Age. She was an independent and hard working lady. She desired that woman should be given a status equal to that of men. She was in favour of higher education for women.

Katherine rode a bicycle and used to read and appreciate the revolutionary ideas of her favourite authors Ibsen, Bernard Shaw and William Morris. Although her ideas were quite different from Mr. Chips’, but she liked his sound personality. Katherine had a very considerate and understanding personality. She was really intelligent as she understood the feelings of other people. She married Chips after understanding his habits and nature. After their marriage, Katherine became a great adviser to Chips. She gave him suggestions regarding how he should deal with his students. Katherine’s radical ideas exercised a healthy influence upon the conservative personality of Mr. Chips. Her understanding of nature, contemporary ideas and intelligent suggestions made her a great wife.

Katherine opposed the idea of class distinction and convinced the authorities at Brookfield to invite the team of boys from the Mission school, which was an institution of average stature. In this way, she earned fame and respect at school in no time on account of her amiable qualities. She was a true representative of the modern woman of the late Victorian Age. She was a very broad-minded and large-hearted woman. Unfortunately, she died during childbirth only two years after her marriage to Mr. Chips. However, her revolutionary ideas and endearing companionship left an everlasting impression on the personality of Mr. Chips.

Q 13. Write a brief note on Mr. Wetherby.

                                                        OR

Write the character sketch of Mr. Wetherby.

Answer:

Mr. Wetherby was the head of Brookfield school when Mr. Chips joined it in 1870. He was a very polite and decent fellow. Mr. Wetherby received him very warmly in his study. During the interview, he encouraged Mr. Chips very much. Wetherby told him that he could sense that Mr. Chips had faced problems in maintaining discipline at Melbury. Wetherby told him that his discipline would improve with the passage of time, as it was a matter of experience. Moreover, he suggested him to maintain a firm attitude with students from the beginning. Mr. Chips did not forget this meeting of his with Wetherby.

Q 14. Write a brief note on Mr. Meldrum.

                                                              OR

Write the character sketch of Mr. Meldrum.

Answer:

The character of Meldrum, in Goodbye, Mr. Chips, is the old headmaster, who had succeeded Wetherby, and remained in that position for almost thirty years. He died of pneumonia due to which Mr. Chips became the Acting Headmaster of Brookfield for a short period of time.

Q 15. Write a brief note on Mr. Ralston.

                                                       OR

Write the character sketch of Mr. Ralston.

Answer:

Mr. Ralston was appointed as the Headmaster of Brookfield. He was an energetic, young fellow of thirty-seven. The author tells us that he was efficient but not, very likeable. He was very strict with students and even with the teachers. He had the kind of personality that could reduce big hall to silence by a mere lifting of an eyebrow. However, Ralston was feared and respected but not liked.

Mr. Ralston did not approve of Mr. Chips because he was an old fashioned teacher. Naturally, he did not like him. He often said that he was a science man himself. He was very keen to raise Brookfield to the level of first rank schools. He told Mr. Chips he aspires to make Brookfield a thoroughly up-to-date school.

One day, he called Mr. Chips to his study and asked him when he would get retirement from the service. Mr. Chips was surprised by the question. When Ralston found him unwilling, he spoke out his heart and raised his objections. He revealed that he found Chips’ teaching methods to be slack and old-fashioned. He complained that Mr. Chips’ personal habits are sloppy and that he dwelled in the past. He even mocked him for the gown he was wearing. He objected to his Latin pronunciation and said he wanted the new style of pronunciation to be taught at Brookfield. Mr. Chips, on the other hand, was not convinced of Ralston’s philosophy of teaching. He said that the boys should be taught the pronunciation that they would practically use even outside Brookfield.

Mr. Chips thought that Ralston was trying to run Brookfield like a factory for turning out a snob culture based on money and machines. Luckily, a small boy had been listening to their dialogue. Students adored Mr. Chips, so the news spread all over in no time. A strong protest rose against Ralston. The board of governors was informed about the issue. The chairman of the board himself visited the school. He ignored Ralston and went to Mr. Chips. He told him that the board disliked Ralston because he was “a bit too clever”. He said to Mr. Chips that Brookfield wouldn’t be the same without him. So, Ralston had to leave Brookfield.

Q 16. Write a brief note on Mr. Chatteris.

                                                     OR

Write the character sketch of Mr. Chatteris.

Answer:

Mr. Chatteris became the Headmaster of Brookfield after Ralston left. He requested Mr. Chips to rejoin Brookfield because he was having a tough time at Brookfield.  He revealed to him that he was thirty-nine and unmarried. He was suffering from diabetes. During his time, the war broke out and most of the teachers had joined the military, while their substitutes were not good at the job, so he had to take preps and classes all by himself. Mr. Chips was in a state of shock after hearing this. He felt sorry for him and accepted the offer.

Q 17. Write a brief note on Mr. Melivale.

                                                             OR

Write the character sketch of Mr. Merivale.

Answer:

Mr. Merivale was Mr. Chips’ doctor. He was also a good friend of Mr. Chips. He visited him for his checkup every fortnight. Whenever Mr. Chips had a cold or the east winds blew, Dr. Marivale advised Mrs. Wickett to look after him properly because of his chest ailment that put a strain on his heart.

Q 18. Write a brief note on Mrs. Wickett.

                                                       OR

Write the character sketch of Mrs. Wickett.

Answer:

Before her retirement, she was the in-charge of the Lenin room at Brookfield School. She was the owner of the house in which Mr. Chips lived after his retirement. She looked after him. Mrs. Wickett was a courteous lady. She entertained his guests with tea and cake. She took great care of his health. It was Mrs. Wickett who called Dr. Marivale when Chips became unconscious, a night before his death. After his death, Mr. Chips left some of his money to Mrs. Wickett as well.

Q 19. Write a note on the life of Mr. Chips after his retirement from Brookfield.

Answer:

 Mr. Chips had a long career of teaching in Brookfield.The two had become inseparable. The chairman of the Board of Governors once said that Brookfield would not be the same without Mr. Chips. After teaching for half a century, Mr. Chips got retired. On his retirement, he made a farewell speech and the teachers as well as the students paid tributes of deep respect and love to Mr. Chips.

After his retirement, Mr. Chips started living at Mrs. Wicket’s house near Brookfield. Mr. Chips lived in a small room simply “furnished with schoolmasterly taste”. A few bookshelves and victory trophies also lay there. After his retirement, Mr. Chips lived with the memories of his wife, Katherine and Brookfield. He kept his time by the bells of the school. He always wound up his clock after the last bell. When war broke in 1916, he was requested to work as an Acting Headmaster.

When he could not come out on cold days, he looked at the school through his window. He received the visitors, both teachers and the old students often. He also entertained new students at Brookfield with tea.

Mr. Chips wrote letters to his friends. He also wrote articles for the school magazine. The Times was his favourite newspaper which he read in the evening. He liked to read detective novels.

His life was carefree. His pension was more than sufficient for him. He even helped the poor out of it. Mrs. Wickett took good care of him. Mr. Merivale, who was his doctor and friend would visit him fortnightly to maintain a check on his health.

On November 1933, Mr. Chips had a severe attack of cold and he died. While breathing his last, he told the doctor that all his students are his children. He really loved them.

Q 20. Describe the pathetic death of Mr. Chips.

                                                                   OR

Narrate the most tragic scene in the novel. OR Describe the last moments of Chips in Brookfield.

Answer:

During Winter, Mr. Chips suffered from a respiratory ailment. Dr. Merivale, his personal physician, had advised him to remain indoors as the winter of 1933 was very frosty and chilly.

On a cold November afternoon, at about quarter to four, a small boy, Linford came to see Mr. Chips. He was sent by the older boys as a practical joke who told him he was called upon by Mr. Chips himself. As Mrs. Wickett had gone out to visit relatives in a neighbouring village, so he went downstairs and received the visitor at the front door in the chilly weather. He let the boy in, entertained him in his traditional way with cake and tea and talked to him for some time. When the boy departed, he came to the front door again and shook hands. It was evening and Chips was feeling quite exhausted. He sat on the chair by the fire. He tried to get up from his chair downstairs and switch on the light but he could not get up. He leaned back in his chair and became unconscious.

When Mrs. Wickett came back, she found him unconscious. She informed the Headmaster, Dr. Merivale. When Chips gained his senses, he found Dr. Merivale around him. In his weak voice, he enquired from the doctor about what had happened. He advised him to try to sleep if he felt inclined. He was surprised to see Mrs. Wickett, Mr. Catwright and others around, but felt was too tired to talk.

He closed his eyes but it was neither sleep nor it was quite a wakefulness, it was a sort of in-between state full of dreams, faces and voices. All the past events like his marriage with Katherine, her tragic death, his long stay at Brookfield, his amusing jokes, and the names of the students flashed on his mind.

Cartwright, the new Headmaster, whispered to Dr. Merivale, “Poor aid chap-must have lived a lonely sort of life, all by himself’. Merivale replied that he once got married at which Cartwright remarked that it was a pity that he never had any children. Hearing these words, Mr. Chips opened his eyes and signalled to attract the attention of others. In his weak voice, he said that all his pupils were his children and he was lucky to have thousands of children all of whom were boys.

Then, he closed his eyes and seemed so peaceful that they did not disturb him. A chorus sang the names of his ex-students in his mind before he fell asleep. But in the morning, it was discovered that Mr. Chips had breathed his last before sleep. In this way, the man who was the Brookfield himself departed from the world.

Q 21. The novel ‘Good-bye Mr. Chips’ has an anti-war theme. Explain with examples from the text.

Answer:

When World War I started, the whole country came to a standstill. All healthy activities ended when the war started. Many of the school teachers who were supposed to educate students enlisted themselves in Armed Forces. School grounds which were meant to be used for Sports became training grounds for the Military during the war. Same was with Brookfield. Military camps sprung up around Brookfield. Soldiers used the playing fields for training which led to the development of an Officer Training Mess at Brookfield. Most of the younger masters had joined the military.

When World War I broke out in 1914, it became the largest conflict that the history had ever seen. The British Empire sent nine million men to war and lost nearly one million of them. Most of them were the public school boys like those mentioned in the “Goodbye Mr. Chips”. One such example quoted in the novel, ‘Goodbye Mr. Chips’ is that of Forrester, killed in the war in 1918. Mr. Chips criticized the Officer Training Corps in the following words when he came to know that the boys from the same school fought against France a hundred years ago:

          “Strange, in a way, that the sacrifices of one generation cancel out those of another”

The novel gives us the message that war is not the proper solution to solve the problems of the world. In a fast changing World, neither friends nor foes are permanent. Mr. Chips said that a hundred years ago, England fought against the French but they became allies later. The loss of lives of those who fought against the French proved meaningless in the end.

For the first time in history, new weapons of mass destruction were used killing hundreds and thousands of citizens. Each week newspapers published lengthy lists of casualties like those that Mr. Chips or Chatteris read out in the chapel every Sunday night after evening service.

The anti-war theme of the novel has also been depicted through Mr. Chips’ comments about food rationing system during the war as he called the rissole, that is, a cake of minced meat, “abhorrendum”, which meant, the meat to be abhorred.

Mr. Chips had sympathy for Max Staefel, the German master, while others had despised him because he was killed while fighting for the enemy country, although he served at Brookfield.

Mr. Chips had anti-war ideas. About “bayonet-practice, he held the view that it was a very vulgar way of killing people”. According to him, all the explosives used in the war were the invention of a new kind of mischief by some stink merchant in his laboratory.

On the whole, we can say that through the ideas and comments of Mr. Chips, James Hilton has very aptly highlighted that war as unwelcomed evil passion. So, there is no doubt that the novel, ‘Good Bye Mr. Chips’ has an anti-war theme.

Q 22. Katherine Bridges had a stronger personality than Mr. Chips. Give reasons for your answer.

Answer:

The personality of Katherine has been beautifully portrayed by James Hilton. She outshines all other characters in the novel. Even the character of Mr. Chips, who is the protagonist of the novel, pales before her qualities. Although she appeared in the novel for a short time, yet she exercised such a brilliant influence on the personality of Mr. Chips that the whole novel echoes with it.

Katherine Bridges was an educated and cultured woman. She was a governess by profession. She was well versed with the cultured and civilized way of life and knew well how to behave in the civilized world. She was soft-spoken and impressive in her talk. She knew how to convey her ideas to others. She also knew the art of persuasion. She always succeeded in persuading Mr. Chips to come round to her viewpoint. Katherine was really very intelligent as she understood the ideas and habits of her husband very well. She married him after understanding his habits and nature. She became the most useful adviser to Chips. He became quite a changed man after his marriage to her. She gave him useful advice in an intelligent way. She advised him how to treat students and how to maintain good discipline. She had a very happy and healthy influence on the mind of her husband. She developed his sense of humour.

Katherine was a very bold and courageous woman. She loved adventure. She was an expert mountaineer. She loved to climb up the dangerous ledges. She could explore the valleys and climb up the hills like Great Gable all alone. She cycled down the lakeside road to reach Wasdale Head where Chips was staying. She was not afraid of visiting a man alone in a farmhouse. She always took bold decisions. It was on her suggestion, that the football match was arranged.

 She possessed radical and socialistic ideas. She loved to read Bernard Shaw who had the strangest and most reprehensible opinions. She admired Ibsen who wrote disturbing plays. In politics, her ideal was William Morris, who possessed liberal ideas. She favoured the right of women to vote and get admission to universities. She was very bold in the expression of her ideas and she expressed them to Chips during her visits. She was a woman of progressive ideas and believed that woman should be given equal status and job opportunities with men.

Katherine was very sympathetic and considerate. When Chips slipped at the Great Gable and wrenched his ankle, she held herself responsible for that and took it upon herself to look after Mr. Chips. She looked after him like a nurse for one week.

As opposed to Mr. Chips’ conservative nature, she was a modern woman with a modern attitude towards life. She did not bother about the conventions and traditions. She was frank and straight forward. She did not like to hide her opinions rather she openly expressed her views in favour of modern values which later on helped Chips to broaden his views.

Katherine was quite antagonistic to Mr. Chips in her views and ideas. She was modern and liberal whereas Chips was conservative and old fashioned. She had a remarkable quality of adjustability. She always advised Chips in a judicious way. She persuaded him to be lenient to the students but be strict in the matters of discipline. She exercised an immense influence on Mr. Chips. She made him quite a new man. She broadened his views, gave a new sparkle to his jokes and made him lovable to all. Although her married life lasted for a very short time yet Chips could never shake off all his influence. He got inspiration from the judicious suggestions given by her.

On the whole, Katherine Bridges possessed genial, affectionate and considerate nature. So she was loved, honoured and admired not only by Mr. Chips but also by the students, teachers and the inhabitants of Brookfield. Her wisdom, alertness, radical thoughts and revolutionary ideas highlight the fact that she had a stronger personality than Mr. Chips.

Q 23. What did Colley do and how was he punished?

Answer:

Colley disturbed the entire class by dropping the lid of the desk while Mr. Chips was delivering the lecture. Mr. Chips punished him by making him write a hundred lines.

Q 24. How was Mr. Chips’ room furnished?

Answer:

It was a small but very comfortable and sunny room. It was decorated in a school-masterly taste. There were a few bookshelves and sporting trophies and a mantelpiece crowded with signed photographs of boys and men. A worn Turkey carpet lay on the ground. Pictures of Acropolis and the Forum were hung on the wall. There were big easy chairs in the room and classical books on the shelves.

Q 25. Why did Mr. Chips hate modern women?

Answer:

The encounter between Mr. Chips and Katherine Bridges took place in 1896. Chips was forty-eight at that time. He was a successful and popular teacher. He was obeyed and honoured. But, he was out of element in the modern world. He was a quiet and conventional person. Especially, he disliked the woman of his time. New women of the late Victorian age filled him with horror”. They were like monstrous creatures to him. He liked weak, timid and delicate women. He disliked the radical ideas of modern writers like Bernard Shaw, Isben and Morris. In short, Mr. Chips hated modern women because he was a conservative man who adhered to old values and traditions.

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