Punjab and private educational institutions

Has been named. In the eight-member committee, four members will represent private universities, while four members will be drawn from the Higher Education Department and the Higher Education Commission of Punjab. It came into being after successful negotiations between Chaudhry Abdul Rehman. In the recent past, in the context of the general situation in Pakistan, the education sector has also faced many difficulties which I mentioned in detail in the previous column. The most important issue is the drastic cut in the education budget, which has shaken the entire education sector. Obviously, the most serious consequences of this have been felt by the government institutions, but many problems have also been created for the private sector. 

Although the nature of these problems was slightly different. Private universities address these issues to relevant government officials, including the Prime Minister and the President

On the 13th of the same month, the private universities of Punjab organized themselves on the platform of an organization called All Private Sector Universities of Punjab (APSUP). Presenting his Charter of Demands to the Punjab Government, he drew attention to some very important and serious issues such as making higher education a top priority. Eliminating the role of red tape for setting up new departments and opening new campuses. One window operation should be facilitated. Eliminate anti-research policies. Eligible students should be given the right to get admission in any university. Recognize the national services of private universities and allow private universities to operate freely in accordance with their charters. 

The association also said that the situation of higher education in Pakistan is already deplorable. In Iran, 52% of young people have access to higher education institutions. 

The rate is 25% in India, 17% in Sri Lanka, Bangladesh 13% in the country and only 9% in Pakistan. The latest situation is that in Pakistan this rate has come down further to only 7%. The organization of private universities raised its voice and bluntly said that if these demands were not heeded then the universities would be locked Will be given. The Punjab government then took action, setting up a negotiating table and setting up an eight-member Higher Education Reforms Committee to resolve the issues. 

It will take some time to see how effective this committee is and how satisfied the private universities are with its performance. An eight-member Higher Education Reforms Committee was formed to set the table and resolve issues. It will take some time to see how effective this committee is and how satisfied the private universities are with its performance. An eight-member Higher Education Reforms Committee was formed to set the table and resolve issues. It will take some time to see how effective this committee is and how satisfied the private universities are with its performance.

An important question is whether private educational institutions are free from all kinds of defects and they are operating within 100% of the rules and regulations? Probably not easy to say. Complaints such as mismanagement or violation of the charter are not entirely unfounded. 

Just as there are various shortcomings in government institutions, the private sector is not immune to them. But it must be acknowledged that the private sector is playing a very important and valuable role in the fields of education and health. In the 1990s, Zulfiqar Ali Bhutto made two important decisions that had far-reaching effects on the education sector and industry. 

They took over all educational institutions and large industrial units. There were immediate positive effects on the education sector. Teachers received government salaries and pensions. Heavy student fees have been phased out, but on the other hand, the scope of education has shrunk. Opening of private institutions Closed 

The burden of government institutions increased. Gradually, the standard of education began to decline. Similar negative effects have been felt in the industrial sector and some economists even say that Pakistan’s industry has not been able to recover from the effects of nationalization and investor confidence has not been fully restored.

Under President Zia-ul-Haq, private educational institutions started opening again. The process has accelerated over the past two and a half decades. Open standard universities in the private sector, especially in the field of higher education. Good teachers were hired in these universities at good salaries. Good quality campuses came into being. Educational facilities improved. Undoubtedly, only those students who could pay hefty fees could go to these universities. As a kind of competitive atmosphere prevailing in the private sector institutions, especially in universities, each institution started improving its facilities to attract more and more students.

Public sector universities did not face any such competition. So keep up the good content. Since teachers and all employees are protected in public sector institutions, there is no standard of performance, no system of punishment, and retribution, so naturally, there is no culture of using one’s full potential and energies. ۔

 Just as the public sector institutions like PIA, WAPDA, Railways and Steel Mills are telling the story of indifference and consuming billions of rupees of the nation, so too most of the public educational institutions are not paying due to the specific policies of the government. Not producing very good results. Red ribbon is also used there. Every day we read such news that so and so universities are empty of regular vice-chancellors. Similarly, budget cuts have had a direct impact on government agencies. Because private universities are largely self-sufficient and their own Deficits make up for the increase in fees. Even a 20% cut in the 2.4% GDP budget has made the situation extremely deplorable. It is estimated that 89% of this budget is spent on salaries. Only 11% of the budget is saved for the remaining development or semi-development purposes. Obviously, it also affects the quality of education. And people turn to relatively good and quality private universities in search of a better education. According to figures from two years ago, about 31% of students were studying in private institutions. That number is certainly increasing. 

Even a 20% cut in the 4% budget has made the situation extremely deplorable. It is estimated that 89% of this budget is spent on salaries. Only 11% of the budget is saved for the remaining development or semi-development purposes. Obviously, it also affects the quality of education. And people turn to relatively good and quality private universities in search of a better education. According to figures from two years ago, about 31% of students were studying in private institutions. 

That number is certainly increasing. Even a 20% cut in the 4% budget has made the situation extremely deplorable. It is estimated that 89% of this budget is spent on salaries. 

Only 11% of the budget is saved for the remaining development or semi-development purposes. Obviously, it also affects the quality of education. And people turn to relatively good and quality private universities in search of a better education. According to figures from two years ago, about 31% of students were studying in private institutions. That number is certainly increasing.

It is commonly said that education has become an industry. This slogan seems appealing, which means that education should not be made a lucrative business. It is so difficult in practical life. An investor of billions cannot do so in the spirit of charity or charity alone. If the government does not have the money and the private sector does not invest in education, where will our children go? There is a need for regulatory bodies to monitor the performance of private universities but to act as a facilitator, not as a constable issuing traffic challans. The bureaucracy usually enjoys creating problems, obstructing, and holding matters back for months and years, and sees it as a weapon to assert its authority. This practice is certainly creating problems for the private sector.

It is to be hoped that the Higher Education Reforms Committee set up in Punjab will play an effective role in this regard. After the 18th amendment, education has been handed over to the provinces. Punjab is the largest province. Punjab also has the largest number of private universities. Can Punjab be a role model for other provinces? In order to achieve positive results, it is important that the private sector is not considered a competitor or non-competitor, but rather their role in the promotion of education is important.