Joseph Lister

 Joseph Lister

Joseph Lester, a British surgeon who introduced the use of antiseptic measures, was born in Upton, England in 1827. In 1852 he received his medical degree from University College London, where he was one of the brightest students. In 1861, he became a surgeon in the Glascoral Infirmary, a position he held for the next eight years. During this time he developed the method of anti-infective surgery.
In the Glascoral Infirmary, Lester was in charge of the wards of the new surgical department. There, he feared the death rate after the operation. Outbreaks such as gangrene were common among patients after surgery. Lister kept his wards clean. However, this did not significantly reduce the death toll.
Doctors there believed that the infection was caused by a strand of organic matter.
However, this argument did not satisfy Lester.
In 1865, he read an article by Louis Pasteur, in which he described the theory of the germs of disease. From this, Lester came to understand the real cause. If the infection was caused by germs, the best way to prevent this infection is to These germs should be killed before entering the open wound.
Using carbolic acid as a disinfectant, Lester introduced a new set of antimicrobial measures. He used to spray carbolic acid in the room before the operation. This resulted in a dramatic reduction in the death rate after the operation.
Between 1861 and 1865, the post-operative mortality rate in the men’s accident department was 45 percent. By 1869, the rate had dropped to 15 percent.
Lester Kawlin’s first article on antimicrobial surgery was published in 1867. His views were not immediately accepted. However, he was offered the chair of the chair of “Clinical Surgery” at the University of Edinburgh in 1869. He continued to fly the flag of popularity here for seven years.
In 1875 he went to Germany, where he lectured on his ideas and methods. The following year he went to the United States for the same purpose. However, the majority of doctors did not yet agree with his views. In 1877, he was presided over the chair of “Clinical Surgery” at King’s College, Leicester, London. He remained here for fifteen years.
As a result, his ideas grew in popularity. In the last years of his life, Lester’s principles of antiseptic surgery gained acceptance from physicians around the world.
For his work, Perlister received numerous honors. He was President of the Royal Society for five years. He was also the personal physician of Queen Victoria. He married but had children. He lived for about eighty-five years.
He died in 1912 in Olmert, England.
Lester’s discoveries revolutionized the field of surgery. Millions of lives could be saved. In addition, surgeons today perform complex surgeries that they could not have dared in the past, when the risk of infection was high, such as a century ago. Breast augmentation surgery was usually unthinkable.
Although much more effective today is used to eradicate germs than Julester did in his day, the basic idea behind it is the same and an extension of Lester’s principles.
It can be said that Lester’s ideas were in fact the result of Pasteur’s ideas. So Lester does not deserve any honor.
The mention of both Lester and Pasteur in this book does not necessarily mean a recurrence of the same discovery. Keeps
There is another objection to listing Leicester in this list.
While working at the Vienna General Hospital, 1818, he demonstrated the benefits of both antiseptic and obstetrics. Although Samuel Weiss became a professor, he wrote an excellent book to express his views. Joseph Listerhi’s writings were sermons and demonstrations that really demonstrated the need for antimicrobials in the field of medicine.

%d bloggers like this: