John F. Kennedy 35th U.S. President

 John F. Kennedy 35th U.S. President

John F. Kennedy
John F. Kennedy
John Fitzgerald Kennedy was born in 1917 in Brooklyn, Massachusetts. He was President of the United States from January 20, 1961 to November 28, 1962. He was killed in Dallas, Texas. I have ignored many other biographical data about Kennedy. Partly because the information is so general, and partly because less of Kennedy’s personal and political engagements formed the basis of his inclusion in the book.
A thousand years from today, no one will remember the “Peace Corps”, the “Alliance for Progress” and so on. Nor will it matter what Kennedy’s policies on Texas or civil rights legislation will be. Life . F. Kennedy is the only person on the list to be responsible for the Apollo Space Program.
If in the future mankind does not kill itself out of fear of its own insecurity, then I am sure that our journey to the moon will be remembered as a memorable event even after five thousand years. This is a milestone in human history.
I will talk more about the lunar travel plan. First of all, I would like to address the question of whether John F. Kennedy is the real person to be held responsible for this whole project.
Isn’t Armstrong or Edwin Aldrin the real recipients of this honor who took the first human step on the moon? If we count people here in terms of their fame, then it would be better because I think that five thousand years from now, Neil Armstrong will be more fresh in people’s minds than John F. Kennedy. And Aldrin is absolutely unimportant.
If, unfortunately, these two men had died two months before the departure of Apollo II, the number of trained and qualified astronauts to replace them would not have been small.
So should this be tied to the head of Sehran and Harwan Brown or any other scientist or engineer who has made significant additions to the knowledge of space travel? There is no doubt that Vernacular Brown did more than his part in making space travel possible (as did some of his most important pioneers, Neston Tassel, Whiskey, Robert H. Goddard, and Hermann Oberth, etc.). Once the Apollo project was politically sanctioned, no scientist was optimistic about its success.
The real milestone in this lunar journey was not a scientific breakthrough, but a political decision to go ahead and spend یس 22 billion on the project.
What was this political decision? Wouldn’t this decision have been made without John F. Kennedy? I have a suspicion that nothing can be said definitively that one or the other government would decide to finance the launch of a manned spacecraft to the moon.
On the other hand, there was no insistence on the part of the people in favor of this costly project. If the US Congress had approved the Apollo Plan and its costs in 1959 or 1960, and then President Eisenhower had rejected the proposal, it could have been said that Kennedy made the decision only because of public opinion. The real facts, however, are radically different.
Most Americans favored this type of space, but there was little public enthusiasm for such a large project. Even after the success of Apollo II, there was a public debate as to whether the cost of the project could be successfully remedied. After 1969, NASA’s budget was greatly reduced.
However, it is clear that it was John F. Kennedy’s leadership that led to the launch of this Apollo project.
It was Kennedy who decided for the United States in May 1961 that “it was Kennedy who got the plan approved by Congress and it was under his leadership that the project began.” One would think that sooner or later the plan to travel to the moon would have been difficult (although nothing can be said definitively about it) but Kennedy was the man who climbed the mountain.
Some friends are still of the opinion that the “Apollo” project was costly and was an insignificant project. However, efforts are being made to establish a national holiday on July 20 (when the first manned spacecraft landed on the moon in 1969). On the other hand, we must not forget that although Columbus Day was not celebrated in the sixteenth century, it is celebrated today as the dawn of a new era.
If the Apollo project is not celebrated annually, it will still be remembered as a great achievement in human history. I believe that one day the importance of the Apollo project will be recognized at the official and public level, and space adventures will be more important in building the future than in the past. Our next generation will feel that the journey of Apollo II, like the journey of Columbus across the Atlantic, is the beginning of a new era in human history.
Publication Date: 2015-08-27

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