English notes for class 11 Sindh Board Chapter 4 My Bank Account

English notes for class 11 Sindh Board Chapter 4 My Bank Account Education in Karachi English XI Notes, Composition, Exercise, Summary, Mcqs, Question Answers, Online Test, Guess Papers, and Past Papers for Class 11th.

English notes for class 11 Sindh Board Chapter 4 My Bank Account

Why is it wiser to keep one’s money in a bank than to hoard it in one’s home?

It is wiser to keep one’s money in a bank than to hoard it in one’s home for a number of reasons. The money deposited in a bank is not only safe from the thieves and robbers, but it also helps a person to spend the money wisely and prevents him from acting like a spendthrift. Moreover, it can also boost the economy of a country.

The author, Stephen Leacock, was a respected university teacher and a highly successful writer. Do you think this is a true story?

I do not think that this is a true story, based on the fact that Professor Stephen Leacock was a respected university teacher and a highly successful humorous writer. Like any other writer, the author has invented the story through his imagination. But, he has narrated it in the first person narrative in order to make it realistic and amusing at the same time.

Why was there ‘a roar of laughter’ when the author left the bank?

When the author left the bank, there was ‘a roar of laughter’ because they were all amused to see how the author made a fool of himself by committing blunders throughout his stay in the bank and ended up withdrawing the total amount that he had deposited a few minutes ago, in his newly opened bank account.

Explain the meaning of the clerk’s question ‘How will you have it’?

By asking the author, ‘How will you have it?’ the clerk is enquiring about the value of the currency notes in which the author would like to have his cheque cashed.

What mistake did the author make when he wrote the cheque?

While writing the cheque for withdrawal, the author wrote fifty-six dollars instead of writing six dollars, which was equivalent to the total amount deposited by him a few minutes ago, in his newly opened bank account.

What is the equivalent of fifty American dollars in Pakistani currency?

In Pakistani currency, one American dollar is equivalent to one hundred and five rupees approximately. Therefore, fifty American dollars are equivalent to five lac thirty-six thousand rupees approximately.

Why did the manager look relieved when he knew the purpose of the author’s visit?

The manager looked relieved when he came to know the purpose of the author’s visit, which was only to open a bank account because he had previously assumed that the author was one of Pinkerton’s detectives.

What was the manager’s reaction when the author told him that he would like to see him alone?

When the author told him that he would like to see him alone, the manager looked at him with some anxiety. He assumed that the author had some terrible secret to reveal and mistook him to be a private detective or a rich man.

Why did the author decide to open an account?

The author decided to open an account because he wanted to deposit his salary, which was raised to fifty dollars a month, in his bank account in order to keep it safe.

According to the author, what is the effect upon him of entering a bank to do business?

Upon entering a bank to do business, the author was frightened. From the sight of the desks and the clerks to that of the money, he was scared of everything. Apparently, it was the author’s first visit to the bank, and he found the sight of everything to be strange and terrifying.

Read more: English notes for class 11 Sindh Board Chapter 3 The United Nations


Composition

  1. Briefly summarize the story. Use the third person all through, and present in the form of reported speech ail the conversation that you retain in your version.
  2. Either (a) Write a brief story, true or fictional, of a humorous misadventure. or (b) Discuss the humour of Stephen Leacock’s short story. Write not more than 350 words.

1.‘My Bank Account’ by Stephen Leacock is a delightful story filled with pleasant humour, which revolves around the author’s experience of visiting a bank for the first time with the intention of opening a bank account. In the beginning of the story, the author reveals that the very sight of a bank makes him nervous. However, he decides to open a bank account in order to deposit his salary which has been raised to fifty dollars a month. The moment he enters the building, he becomes an irresponsible fool. He heads towards the accountant, who is a tall man, but the sight of him scares him. In a timid voice, he tells the ac­countant that he wishes to see the manager. The intimidating personality of the manager makes him more nervous, and he clutches the notes in his hand tightly. He requests the manager if he can see him alone. Hearing this, the manager gets suspicious and takes him to his office and locks the door. , he asks him if he belongs to Pinkerton’s detective agency.

The writer tells him that he is not a detective, but has come to open a bank account. Hearing this, the manager assumes that he must be a millionaire who intends to make a huge investment. However, the author reveals that he wants to deposit fifty-six dollars. The manager gets offended and calls the accountant to assist him in opening his account. The narrator pushes the ball of money towards the accountant as if he is performing a juggler’s trick. After completing the forms, he is able to open the bank account. He wishes to draw six dollars for present use, but in the state of panic, he writes fifty-six dollars on the cheque instead of six. Surprised, the clerk seeks confirmation if he wishes to draw all his money. Although, the author realizes his mistake, but in order to cope with his embarrassment, he disguises himself as a man of fearful temper and replies in affirmation. On being asked about the mode of payment, he tells him that he wishes to take it in fifty dollar notes. He gets a fifty-dollar note, and as soon as the remaining six dollars are paid, he rushes out of the bank. As he leaves, he hears a roar of laughter from the staff. At the end of the story, the author reveals that since that day, he keeps his money in his pocket and his savings in silver dollars in a sock.

2. (a) My friends and I have a knack for dining out so we make sure to visit every new restaurant that opens in town. Trying all the different cuisines from across the world is always a delightful experience. Intrigued by its name, ‘The Cave Diner’, one fine evening, we decided to visit the recently launched café in town. Initially, five of us planned to go for the dinner, but with the passage of time, many of our classmates joined us. Eventually, ten girls pushed each other in a single car, drove past the highway and reached the restaurant located at the edge of the main road. “Make sure you lock the doors”, Sarah shouted from behind. “If any of you pushes the other any further, all will fall out on the road like a stock of sheep.” All of us burst with a roar of laughter.


It was 9:00 pm when we reached the restaurant. Excited to see the hanging skulls at the entrance door, we entered the restaurant, which appeared to be what was like a scary, deserted cave, one “sheep” after the other. The inside view of the restaurant was as bleak, dark and gloomy as a cave would be. We were hardly able to see anything. Fooled by our vision of a cave, it did not occur to us that something could be wrong with a restaurant being so haunted looking.
 We followed a flash of lightning coming from one corner. “Ouch”, screamed Hira. All of us asked her at once, “What happened?” Apparently, she had disturbed our wildest fantasy of exploring a haunted place together. The next thing we saw was the light travelling closer to us. Shaking with horror, all of us ran away at once. The guy holding the torch shouted from the back, “Hey there! I’m no ghost. The restaurant is closed from the past month because of the ongoing construction work.”

2. (b) Stephen Leacock occupies a reputable place among the humorists of the world. ‘My Financial Career’, adapted as ‘My Bank Account’, reflects Leacock’s ability to create humour even out of the simple day to day affairs. The humour in this story is marked with the power of sharp observation and criticism of follies of the world. The glorious title of the story is itself humorous and it forces the readers to believe that the theme of the story must be centered upon the major ups and downs in the financial investments of the narrator or the acquisition of wealth and property, but they find it to be a story of an ordinary employee, earning a meager amount every month. The narrator has employed his creative genius to make fun of the irrational behaviour of the world where a common man like himself experiences fear and anxiety and ends up making a fool of himself.


In this story, Leacock realistically presents how the narrator of the story becomes a laughing stock. At the beginning of the story, he admits that the sight of banks and everything about them “rattles” him. Visiting a bank proves to be a very embarrassing and humiliating experience for the narrator. The way he behaves feels and talks makes the readers laugh at his miserable condition.
 The humor of the piece is achieved not only by the exaggerated situation but also by skillful use of short clips of dialogue. When the narrator enters the bank, he musters the courage to approach an accountant who appears to be a terrifying creature to him, and calls him “a tall, cool devil”. Assuming that one has to see the bank manager to open an account, he requests to be allowed to meet him alone. The word ‘alone’ leads to misunderstanding on part of the manager, who predicts that he is either some private detective, who has arrived to share some serious information or a rich millionaire who has a large sum of money to invest. Learning that the narrator has only fifty-six dollars, he instructs the accountant to assist him in opening an account.


When the author goes up to the accountant’s window, he pushes the ball of money towards the clerk quickly as if he is performing a juggler’s trick. After opening the account, he wishes to draw six dollars for present use. But, in the state of panic, he writes fifty-six dollars on the cheque instead of six and ends up withdrawing all his money back. On being asked the mode of payment, he says that he wants to take it in fifty dollar notes. After having received the money, he rushes out of the bank, hearing a roar of laughter from the staff. The story ends with the confession that after such a miserable experience, he keeps his money in his pocket and his savings in silver dollars in a sock.


The central character of the story is portrayed by Leacock as a helpless fellow whose visit to the bank proves futile. In this story, Leacock gives minute details of the painful experience of the narrator at the bank, from the rise in his salary, to the conversation with the manager, his imaginary fears, mistake in writing the cheque and lastly, his firm decision not to step in the bank in future to highlight problems of those who have no idea of bank transactions. In short, Leacock’s humour stems from the peculiar behaviour of an ordinary fellow who finds the way of this world quite challenging.


Exercise 17

Answer each of the following questions three times, (1) using going to and an infinitive; (2) using shall or will; and (3) using intend to or expect to:

  1. What are you going to do now?
  2. When are you going to buy new sails for your boat?
  3. Who is going to be at the party?
  4. Where are you going to spend your holidays?
  5. How much are you going to pay for your sailing boat?
  6. When is he going to start learning Russian?
  7. Whom are you going to invite to the dance?
  8. When is he going to have his hair cut?
  9. Why are you going to fly instead of taking a ship?
  10. What are the workmen going to do to the refrigerator?
S. No.QuestionAnswer Using ‘going to’ and an InfinitiveAnswer Using ‘shall’ or ‘will’Answer Using ‘intend to’ or ‘expect to’
1.What are you going to do now?                                  I am going to complete my homework now.I shall complete my homework now.I intend to complete my homework now.
2.When are you going to buy new sails for your boat?I am going to buy new sails for my boat the day after tomorrow.I shall buy new sails for my boat the day after tomorrow.I intend to buy new sails for my boat the day after tomorrow.
3.Who is going to be at the party?All my friends are going to be at the party.All my friends will be at the party.All my friends are expected to be at the party.
4.Where are you going to spend your holidays?I am going to spend my holidays in my hometown.I shall spend my holidays in my hometown.I intend to spend my holidays in my hometown.
5.How much are you going to pay for your sailing boat?I am going to pay ten thousand rupees for my sailing boat.I shall pay ten thousand rupees for my sailing boat.I intend to pay ten thousand rupees for my sailing boat.
6.When is he going to start learning Russian?He is going to start learning Russian from next month.He shall start learning Russian from next month.He intends to start learning Russian from next month.
7.Whom are you going to invite to the dance?I am going to invite my friends to dance.I shall invite my friends to the dance.I intend to invite my friends to dance.
8.When is he going to have his hair cut? (Note: Mistake in the book. Correction: When is he going to have his haircut?)He is going to have his haircut tomorrow.He shall have his haircut tomorrow.He intends to have his haircut tomorrow.
 9.Why are you going to fly instead of taking a ship?I am going to fly instead of taking a ship in order to save my time.I shall fly instead of taking a ship in order to save my time.I intend to fly instead of taking a ship in order to save my time.
10.What are the workmen going to do to the refrigerator?The workmen are going to repair the refrigerator.The workmen shall repair the refrigerator.The workmen intend to repair the refrigerator.

Exercise 18

Restate the following sentences so that they refer to the future. Replace the given adverbial phrase of time, where necessary, by the one in brackets.

  1. We started our holiday last Saturday. (next week)
  2. She had a baby last February. (next April)
  3. It rained last night. (tomorrow)
  4. I had my first driving lesson yesterday. (tomorrow)
  5. The ship sailed for Hong Kong last months (next month)
  6. The war ended three months ago. (in three months time)
  7. They got married last Tuesday. (on Tuesday week).
  8. An eclipse of the sun took place last year, (next year)
  9. The director dismissed ten employees a week ago. (in a week’s time)
  10. The post arrived late.
  11. I have changed my job.
  12. We went to the theatre on Saturday evening.
  13. He has left Buenos Aires for Rio de Janeiro.
  14. We didn’t have enough money to buy a car.
  15. She sent me a postal-order for my birthday.
  16. We were back before dark.
  17. My birthday fell on a Tuesday last year, (next year)
  18. She had her hair waved before the party.
  19. I had to leave Paris before midnight.
  20. My brother bought a new television set for £ 80.

Answer:
1. We are shall start our holiday next week.
2. She is shall have a baby next April.
3. It will rain tomorrow.
4. I will have my first driving lesson tomorrow.
5. The ship will sail for Hong Kong next month.
6. The war would end in three months’ time.
7. They will get married on Tuesday next week. {Note: Mistake in the book. Correct statement: They got married last Tuesday. (on Tuesday next week)}
8. An eclipse of the sun would take place next year.
9. The director would dismiss ten employees in a week’s time.
10. The post will arrive late.
11. I shall change my job.
12. We will go to the theatre on Saturday evening.
13. He will leave Buenos Aires for Rio de Janeiro.
14. We won’t have enough money to buy a car.
15. She will send me a postal-order for my birthday.
16. We will be back before dark.
17. My birthday will fall on a Tuesday next year.
18. She will have her hair waved before the party.
19. I shall have to leave Paris before midnight.
20. My brother will buy a new television set for £ 80.


Exercise 19

Put the verb in brackets into the correct form of the Future Perfect :

1. By the end of the month I (finish) my job.
2. We (spend) all our money by the end of the holiday.
3. By next June I (be) in Greece for five years.
4. They (complete) the arrangements by the time you arrive.
5. By tea-time I (work) for eight hours and I (not finish) by then, either.
6. We (play) tennis for four hours if we don’t stop before dark.
7. If it continues to rain like this the farmers (not harvest) all their crops before September.
8. By next October he (work) for the same company for thirty- five years.
9. The class (study) all the irregular verbs by next week.
10.  He’s building his own boat. I expect he (finish) it by Easter.
11. If you’re going to be so late, the children (have) their tea before you get back.
12. On July 6 we (be married) for exactly eleven years.
13. The film (start) long before we reach the cinema.
14. The train (arrive) and the passengers (leave) the station if we don’t hurry.
15. By next January he (work) as a newspaper reporter for ten years and he (write) something like 520 different articles.

Answer:
1. By the end of the month, I shall have finished my job.
2. We shall have spent all our money by the end of the holiday.
3. By next June I shall have been in Greece for five years.
4. They will have completed the arrangements by the time you arrive.
5. By tea-time, I shall have worked for eight hours and I shall not have finished by then, either.
6. We shall have played tennis for four hours if we don’t stop before dark.
7. If it continues to rain like this the farmers will not have harvested all their crops before September.
8. By next October he will have worked for the same company for thirty- five years.
9. The class will have studied all the irregular verbs by next week.
10.  He’s building his own boat. I expect he will have finished it by Easter.
11. If you’re going to be so late, the children will have had their tea before you get back.
12. On July 6 we shall be married for exactly eleven years.
13. The film will have started long before we reach the cinema.
14. The train will have arrived and the passengers will leave the station if we don’t hurry.
15. By next January he will have worked as a newspaper reporter for ten years and he will have written something like 520 different articles.


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