Changez Khan

Changez Khan

The great Mongol conqueror Genghis Khan was born around 1162. His father was a modest Mongol chief who named his son Timo Jin after an open rival chief. When Temujin died in November, his father was killed by members of a tribe. For the next few years, the rest of the family hid under constant threat. It was an ominous start. Temojan had to go through a lot of hardships before seeing a good day.
 In his youth, he was captured by a rival tribe. He was held captive by a wooden circle around his neck. Out of this state of helplessness, the illiterate captive of an ancient and barren country, Temojan, became the most powerful man in the world.
 Its development began after its escape from captivity.
 (to be continued)
 He met a friend of his father and the chief of one of the tribes concerned.
 For many years there were deadly wars between the Mongol tribes in which Temojan continued his journey to greatness. One of the reasons why Mongolian tribesmen are famous is that they are skilled horsemen and warriors. We see in history that they continued to attack northern China. Before Temujin, many tribes used their energies to fight against each other.
 Military bravery cleared the hypocrisy and with a combination of managerial ability, Temujin united all these tribes under one central leadership.
 This formidable military force mobilized by Genghis Khan invaded the neighboring nations. He first invaded the Sahih State in northwestern China and the Jin Empire in northern China.
 While these rivalries were going on, a quarrel broke out between Genghis Khan and Kharazm Shah Muhammad, the king of a great empire in Iran and Central Asia. In 1219, Genghis Khan marched on Kharazm Shah with his troops. Central Asia and Iran were devastated. Khawarizm Shah’s empire was completely destroyed. Other Mongol armies invaded Russia. Meanwhile, Genghis Khan invaded Afghanistan and northern India.
 He returned to Mongolia in 1225, where he died in 1227. Shortly before his death, he requested that his third son, Oghdai, be appointed his successor. It was a wise choice. Ogden proved himself to be an intelligent and shrewd fighter. Under his leadership, the Mongol armies continued to advance in China. They trampled on Russia and moved on to Europe.
 In 1241 the Mongol armies advanced as far as Budapest. Poland defeated the German and Hungarian armies. The same Ogdai died. The Mongol armies returned from Europe and never returned.
 After that, the issue of succession was taken up by the Mongol chiefs. However, Genghis Khan’s grandsons Mango Khan and Kublai Khan entered Mongol Asia.
 By 1279, when Kublai Khan completed his conquest of China, the Mongol Empire had become the largest empire in history. He ruled over China, Russia, and Central Asia. In addition to Iran and most of Southwest Asia, these armies raised victory flags from Poland to northern India. Kublai Khan’s kingdom was established in Korea, Tibet, and Southeast Asia.
 In the presence of the ancient means of arrival in this period, such a vast empire of Tawir could not have survived. Soon these parts were divided into pieces. However, the Mongol rule in the states lasted for a long time. In 1368, the Mongols were expelled from most parts of China. His age in Russia has grown. There, the kingdom of Batu Khan, the grandson of Genghis Khan, is commonly called the Golden Jirga. It lasted until the sixteenth century, while in Crimea it lasted until 1783.
 Genghis Khan’s other sons and grandsons established empires in Central Asia and Iran. Both territories were conquered by Timur Ling in the 14th century. He was of Mongol descent and called himself the successor of Genghis Khan. The end of Timurling’s reign took place in the fifteenth century. But this was not the end of all Mongol conquests and power. Babur, the great-grandson of Timurling, invaded India and founded the Mughal (Yamangol) Empire.
 Eventually, the Mughal rulers occupied all of India and this power lasted till the middle of the twentieth century.
 In history, we see the continuation of the arrival of such people or crazy people. Who set out to conquer the world and achieved immense success. Among these leaders are Alexander the Great, Genghis Khan, Napoleon Bonaparte, and Adolf Hitler.
 After all, why are the names of these four so prominent in this list? Aren’t ideas more important than armies? I agree that the power of the pen is greater than the sword. These four figures ruled over a vast area and population and made such indelible impressions on the lives of their contemporaries. Except for the general looters can never be counted in the ranks.